tips on applying makeup with parkinson's

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The tremor in my right hand has progressed so that I have a difficult time applying my makeup with it. I’m fortunate that I’m sort of ambidextrous, so it was relatively easy to switch hands. However, I’ve been wondering what I’ll do when my tremor migrates to my left hand.  Here are few tips that might be help. If you have any suggestions please share them.

1. If you stand in the bathroom, try to find a place to sit instead. It may help your tremor and you can rest your elbow on a counter or table for stability.

2. Use a magnifying mirror. You will be surprised how much more you see (good and bad) and catch little mistakes that you’d not see otherwise.

3. Find a place with good natural light to apply your makeup. You’ll see how your makeup will really look when you’re out and about, as artificial light can sometimes not be accurate.

4. Take your time and don’t rush. I made this mistake by giving myself the same amount of time to get ready as I did before I was diagnosed with PD. Little by little as my symptoms increased it was taking a little longer to get ready but I hadn’t realized it, so I found I was rushing around. Give yourself extra time so you can apply it in a relaxed state.

5. Drugstore vs. Department Store brands – I use both but I noticed that drugstore brands generally have less pigment than department store brands which means they can be a little more forgiving. However, that can also mean the application doesn’t last as long, so you may need to apply it again during the day.

6. If you use a foundation, use a primer beforehand. It really does help the foundation stay put longer.

7. Use transparent lip colors instead of opaque colors. They are more forgiving, and you don’t need to be as precise around the edges, particularly if you use darker colors.

8. Lip stains are also a good way to minimize having to retouch as often.

9. Cream or powder – Eye shadow, foundation, blush, they all come in both creams & powders. Try them to see which ones are easier for you to apply.

10. Application – You can apply makeup with sponges, brushes, or your fingers. Again, try them all and see which is more comfortable for you. I used to use a sponge for my foundation but now I use my fingers because I feel like I have better control in smoothing it out.

11. Double duty- Tinted moisturizer, BB or CC creams are a great way to combine skincare, moisturizer and foundation in one.

12. Lastly, permanent eyebrow or liner tattooing might be right for you. The eyebrow tattooing of old has progressed quite a bit and looks much more natural.

dear kai

I got this email from one of our readers and thought it would be a good post. If you have any suggestions for a topic or a question, please email me at asimpleislandlife@gmail.com and I’ll be happy to try and answer on the blog or in private.

 “Dear Kai, I’ve had PD for about six years and I’m finding it difficult to motivate myself to exercise. I’ve been a moderate on and off exerciser most of my life. I’m tired a lot and it’s easier to put it off for another day. Any suggestions?”

Motivating yourself to exercise can be extra challenging with a chronic illness. Fatigue, tremors, dystonia, balance issues, and physical weakness can add up to saying “maybe tomorrow”. And if you’re a person who didn’t exercise much before you’re diagnosis, it can be a tall order to start exercising after.  But we all know the mantra that beyond for normal wellness, we with PD must exercise as much as we can. Here are a few ways to help.

Make it fun – There is much ongoing research on which exercises are best for PWP but I say the ones that you enjoy will be the ones you do the most. There are so things to choose from and you may need to try a few before you find something you like. Is there something you did when you were younger that you enjoyed and could start up again?

Make it convenient – Do things that are close in proximity to where you live or work. Research shows that the farther away your exercise place is, the less frequently you will go.

Figure out your personality – Are you the type of person who will show up more often when you are accountable to someone? Then find an exercise buddy. Aside from the workout, you could get a cup of coffee afterwards and get a twofer of exercise and a nice chat with a friend. Do you prefer having a set day and time each week or would rather have flexibility if your schedule differs a lot?

Make it a family activity – If you have kids or grand kids, doing exercise together is a great way to bond. How about an easy hike, or hit some balls at a golf range. Or while you’re waiting for your kids at their sports practice, instead of waiting on the sidelines, walk around the field or neighborhood.

Write it down – Keep track of your exercise and you’ll see your progress and accomplishments. When you look at your monthly calendar and see how many times you actually did exercise, it can encourage you to keep going.

Change it up – I get bored doing the same exercises all the time so I do a variety of things. Kickboxing one day a week, walk with someone another day, go to the gym, do yoga at home, swim, walk on the sand. It keeps it interesting and fresh.

Cut yourself some slack – When you miss a day, that’s ok. Just get back at it the next day. Sometimes we are too hard on ourselves and are always looking at what we didn’t do, instead of what we did accomplish.

Every little bit helps – You don’t always need a hardcore workout. It seems we have designed our world to eliminate physical movement in our day to day lives. In his book The Blue Zones, Dan Buettner talks about the places in the world where their populations live longer and healthier, and that one of the common traits they have is they incorporate exercise into their daily lives. So walk to the store if you can, take the stairs instead of the elevator. Ask your yard person to come every other time and you do the lawn on the alternate weeks. There are many ways to incorporate movement into our daily lives if we look for them.

 

 

 

 

 

19 for 2019

it’s that time again. time for goal planning for the new year. i have always loved goal planning and over the years have incorporated many different styles and methods. so i thought it would be fun to do it with parkinson’s in mind. 19 for 2019 is a popular goal setting idea of choosing 19 goals. here we go.

  1. join a boxing for pd class.

  2. join a support group.

  3. join an online pd forum and share your experiences with someone who could use your help.

  4. sign up with the michael j. fox foundation trial finder to see if you can participate in a clinical trial.

  5. commit to doing a little exercise each day.

  6. find something to laugh at each day.

  7. make a donation or give of your time to a pd organization.

  8. eat food, not too much, mostly plants.

  9. meditate for 5 minutes a day.

  10. write down one thing each day that you’re grateful for.

  11. sign up for a podcast about parkinson’s.

  12. practice being present.

  13. order or put together an aware in care kit.

  14. see your dentist.

  15. keep a journal of your changing symptoms and write down the specific items to discuss before each doctor visit.

  16. make a new pd friend either in person or online.

  17. if you shop with amazon, sign up with amazon smile which donates a portion of your purchase to the MJF research foundation or any other charity at no cost to you.

  18. learn and practice how to fall.

  19. whatever it is you tried and didn’t finish. it’s ok. just begin again.

    ~ now it’s your turn. i’d love to hear what are your goals this year?

little mood boosters

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when you have parkinson’s, your mood can go south quickly and out of nowhere. you may have a wearing off period or side effect from your medication, you suddenly get fatigued, or if you’re like me, you can get a little foggy (it sort of feels like fireworks are going off in my brain). when you’re having a challenging day, sometimes just doing something small can pick you up and make you feel a little better. it sort of interrupts the cycle just long enough to get you back on track. so i’ve found little mood boosters that can help.

~ go outside and just look at the sky

~ take a walk

~ listen to an inspirational podcast or audio book (if you need suggestions email me i have a bunch i like)

~ read a few pages of an inspirational or funny book

~ listen to some upbeat music

~ call or text a friend or family member

~ meditate

~ clean or declutter something that can be finished in one sitting

~ organize my to do & want to lists

~ watch a short funny video

~ be a tourist in your own city for the afternoon

~ dance or sing for five minutes

what things do you do that help boost your mood? ~kai

losing your sense of smell & taste

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one of the potential symptoms of parkinson’s is losing your sense of smell, which in turn lessens your sense of taste. foods become more bland and not as interesting. my coffee in the morning used to be an incredible experience of smell and taste first thing in the morning and although i still love the experience that comes with coffee and my morning routine, the coffee itself is definitely not as flavorful as it used to be.

as i’ve mentioned in a previous post, it might also be contributing to why my sweet tooth has increased. my taste buds might be seeking more extreme flavors to get satiated. so it can be easy to go overboard with salt or sugar while cooking without knowing it. so here are few things that can help boost the flavor quotient of food.

  1. vinegar & lemon juice - both of these can bring an extra depth of flavor to most dishes. you can add a tablespoon of vinegar during cooking or at the end, but use fresh lemon juice at the end of cooking to keep the flavor bright.

  2. citrus zest - aside from the juice, the zest with all the oils adds a wonderful intense citrus flavor. zest the fruit first and then juice it.

  3. spices - you can go in so many different directions with just the use of spices. spice blends are also a great. i have been loving sumac lately.

  4. herbs - fresh or dried they can add tremendous flavor to foods. if you can have a few pots of them growing, even better. something as simple as a large handful of chopped mixed herbs in an omelet can elevate the dish to something special.

  5. condiments - mustards, hot sauces, ko chu jang, harissa, & miso are all great ways to add an umami bomb of flavor.

  6. bitter vegetables - radicchio, endive, broccoli rabe, and mustard greens. adding these to salads, soups, stir fries can add a pop of interesting flavor.

  7. pomegranate molasses - this used to be an exotic ingredient but now can be found in many grocery stores or online. it’s thick and has a sweet and sour flavor and is delicious. add a spoonful to your vinaigrette, drizzle it over roasted vegetables, or brush it over cooked meats while they are resting.

    many of these spices and condiments will last for a long time, so i have a ton of them in my fridge. that way i can cook simply but change the direction with a different spice. i can pick up a package of chicken thighs and pan fry them with a mustard sauce, or smear them with a ko chu jang sauce and bake them, or simmer them in a curry sauce.

    have you started losing your taste and smell and if so what are some other ways that you add flavor to your foods?

    ~kai